Scotland’s Referendum: Democracy

Scotland’s Referendum isn’t about two different destinations; It’s a fork in the road. It’s about the nation we are, and the nation we want to be.

An effective, responsive democracy is central to a functioning society. It’s how we ensure stability, fairness and progress, but we can only have these things if our democracy works properly. The UK’s democracy is stuck in the past – an unelected second chamber, an unrepresentative voting system and a profound lack of transparency means that we often end up with a government that isn’t acting in our best interests. Scotland’s devolved democratic institutions are good, but they can be better. Independence is our only real chance to have the modern democracy we deserve.


Vote Yes for a smarter democracy

  • Scotland already uses a voting system that is far more representative than Westminster
  • With independence, we can have a written constitution embedded with democratic values
  • Democracies work best when they’re small and responsive – Scotland is the perfect size to achieve this
  • Decisions made in Edinburgh are more relevant to Scots than decisions made in London
  • Independence means we finally get the government we vote for – no more decades of brutal Tory rule

Vote No for a broken democracy

  • UK democracy is under the thumb of lobby groups and party donors, and is deeply resistant to reform
  • Westminster’s voting system means that a party can win a huge majority of seats without a majority of votes
  • The House of Lords is unelected, and has 92 hereditary peers – plans to change this have been stalled by the Tories
  • The South East of England elects 83 MPs – Scotland elects just 59
  • With a No vote, Scotland will continue getting Tory governments that we don’t want

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Ross Colquhoun
Visual Artist and Blogger
rosscolquhoun.com

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About Ross Colquhoun

Ross Colquhoun is a visual artist, graphic designer and the director of National Collective. An alumni of Edinburgh College of Art's School of Visual Communication and founder of Human Resources, he believes that art has immeasurable power to influence people, to inspire ideas and to motivate change. He envisions a scenario in which independence would bring a new cultural confidence to Scotland.

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